May 2019 Volume LIV Number 3

 
 
 
fullsizeoutput_2

Healthy People Report

November 2012 Volume XLVIII Number 6

healthypeoplegraphhealthypeoplegraphhealthypeoplegraphIn 2009–2010, 14 percent of children aged 3–5 years had untreated dental caries. Among children aged 6–9 years, 17 percent had untreated dental caries, and among adolescents aged 13–15, 11 percent had untreated dental caries.
 

Among children aged 3–5 years, the prevalence of untreated caries was significantly higher for non-Hispanic black children (19 percent) compared with non-Hispanic white children (11 percent).

Untreated caries was nearly twice as high for Hispanic children (26 percent) compared with non-Hispanic white children (14 percent) aged 6–9 years,

Untreated caries was more than twice as high for non-Hispanic black adolescents (25 percent) compared with non-Hispanic white adolescents (9 percent) aged 13–15.

For children aged 3–5 and 6–9 years living at or below 100 percent of the federal poverty level, untreated dental caries was significantly higher compared with children living above the poverty level. For adolescents, the difference in the prevalence of untreated caries was not statistically significant between the two income groups.

Thirty-two percent of children aged 6–9 years and 51 percent of adolescents aged 13–15 had at least one dental sealant on a permanent tooth in 2009–2010. Dental sealant prevalence was lower among children living at or below 100 percent of the federal poverty level (26percent) compared with children living above the poverty level (34 percent).

Dental sealant prevalence was significantly lower for non-Hispanic black adolescents (32 percent) compared with non-Hispanic white adolescents (56 percent), among those aged 13–15.

In sum, untreated dental caries was more prevalent among Hispanic children than both non-Hispanic whites and non-Hispanic black children. Additionally, children living below 100 percent of the poverty level were more likely to have untreated decay and less likely to have dental sealants.

Within the framework of Healthy People, six objectives that monitor oral health in children and adolescents, seven objectives that monitor oral health in adults, eight objectives that focus on improving access to preventive dental services, seven objectives that monitor the use of interventions, and five objectives that relate to surveillance systems and program infrastructure. Additionally, oral health is one of the top 12 leading health indicators for Healthy People 2020.

For more information on Healthy People 2020, you may access the US Department of Health and Human Services Administration website at: http://www.healthypeople.gov/2020/ about/default.aspx.

The full report, Oral Health Disparities as Determined by Selected Healthy People 2020 Oral Health Objectives for the United States, 2009–2010, is available on the policy center page of the AAPD website.

For more information, contact AAPD Pediatric Oral Health Research and Policy Center Assistant Director Jan Silverman at jsilverman@aapd.org.


About Healthy People

Healthy People is a document published by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services which contains national health-related goals and objectives.

Healthy People provides science-based, 10-year national objectives for improving the health of all Americans. For three decades, Healthy People has established benchmarks and monitored progress over time in order to:

Encourage collaborations across communities and sectors.

Empower individuals toward making informed health decisions.

Measure the impact of prevention activities.

More information about Healthy People 2020 is available at http://www.healthypeople.gov.