November 2018 Volume LIII Number 6

 
 
 
Covercrop

Media Mix

March 2016 Volume LI Number 2

AAPD in Washington Post Article

Christie Aschwanden interviewed AAPD national spokesperson Dr. Sarat Thikkurissy for a story on sedation dentistry that appeared in the health and science section of the Washington Post.  According to the article:

"Sedation dentistry is generally safe for kids, but you should ask lots of questions before allowing a dentist to sedate your child, says Sarat Thikkurissy, a spokesman for the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry who practices dentistry in Cincinnati. The AAPD and the American Academy of Pediatrics have a joint set of guidelines for sedation in children, and you will want to make sure your dentist is familiar with them, Thikkurissy says. Also, some states require a special permit for giving sedation to children younger than 12. Any practitioner should be prepared to rescue the child from an adverse reaction. That’s where an emergency plan comes in," Thikkurissy says."

 

Philly.com Features Dr. Connie Killian on Halloween

Today’s guest blogger is Connie Killian, D.M.D., a national spokesperson for the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry. She is in private practice in Doylestown, Penn. Killian is also an adjunct associate professor of pediatric dentistry at the University of Pennsylvania and is an attending pediatric dentist at The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia.

Halloween is one of the most anticipated holidays of the year for kids, and although it’s spooky, it doesn’t need to be scary for little teeth. Each year, Americans spend nearly $9 billion on candy, and approximately 41 million trick-or-treating children across the country will collect a large portion of those goodies. When enjoying treats this year, remember the best trick to scare away Mouth Monsters (the bacteria that cause cavities), is moderation and proper oral hygiene. Read more at http://www.philly.com/philly/blogs/healthy_kids/What-are-some-better-sweets-for-my-childs-teeth.html#7jVubv5tEGCMEXuF.99.

 

AAPD Noted on Safebee.com for Teething Story

Jennifer Geddes interviewed AAPD President Elect Dr. Jade Miller and AAPD member Dr. Alice Lee for a story that appeared on this site on Nov. 4.  

 

Weber Shandwick Consumer Hub Articles

The #1 Most Cost-Effective Way to Prevent Tooth Decay

Preventing tooth decay can cost as little as a few cents per day.  Find out how in our infographic: http://mouthmonsters.mychildrensteeth.org/the-1-most-cost-effective-way-to-prevent-tooth-decay/.

 

Test Your Teeth I.Q.—A Day of Dental Health

Help your child make healthy choices and test your teeth I.Q. with our interactive quiz: http://mouthmonsters.mychildrensteeth.org/a-day-of-dental-health/.

 

Little Teeth Truths: AAPD Parliamentarian Dr. Sara Filstrup

Question: Should parents help pull out a child’s wiggly tooth or let it fall out on its own? 

Answer: My best advice is to let nature take its course!  Parents should encourage kids to gently wiggle the tooth with their finger or tongue until it naturally falls out on its own.  Pulling the tooth out before it is ready may actually cause unnecessary bleeding and pain, which could be upsetting.  Although it is rare, if you see a permanent tooth coming in and the baby tooth won’t fall out, call your pediatric dentist to see if help is needed to remove the baby tooth.  The best approach is to keep an eye out for any problems and let the tooth fall out on its own. And then, you and your little one can celebrate with your very own tooth fairy tradition to mark this big-kid milestone!

 

Little Teeth Truths: AAPD Secretary-Treasurer Dr. Joe Castellano

Question: Can cavities be spread through saliva?

Answer: It’s common knowledge that illnesses such as the flu and the common cold are contagious. But many parents might be surprised to find out the bacteria that causes cavities is also contagious, and can be passed along through saliva! As a parent or caregiver, this is important to keep in mind when going about your day with your little one. It’s best to avoid activities such as sharing a plate or blowing on your child’s food in order to help prevent sharing saliva that might carry cavity-causing bacteria. While it’s important to be aware of this, remember, the number one way to prevent cavities is to brush and floss each morning and night. Don’t forget to supervise your little ones during these daily dental routines until they are seven or eight years of age, or able to tie their own shoes, in order to ensure healthy little teeth. 

 

Media Outlet

AAPD Expert(s)

Date Featured

Topic 

LSU School of Dentistry

Dr. John A. Hendry (La.)

September 2015

Dr. John Hendry Named Distinguished Alumnus

Birmingham Parent

Dr. Stephanie H. Steinmetz (Ala.)

Sept. 30, 2015

Halloween Candy: To Eat or Not Eat?

Grand Forks Herald

Dr. Brent L. Holman (N.D.)

Oct. 9, 2015

Dental Therapist Experiment Isn’t Working

Northwest Herald

Dr. Kathleen A. Schroeder (Ill.)

Oct. 18, 2015

On the Record With: McHenry

County’s First Woman Dentist

Al Dia Dallas

Dr. Maria-Jose Cervantes Mendez (Texas)

Oct. 19, 2015

Caring for Children’s Teeth

Baltimore Sun

Dr. Warren A. Brill (Md.)

Oct. 20, 2015

Brushing With Fluoride Prevents Tooth Decay

El Planeta

Dr. Maria-Jose Cervantes Mendez (Texas)

Oct. 20, 2015

Halloween: Meet the Best and Worst Kinds of Candy for Children’s Teeth

Discovery News

Dr. Robyn R.  Loewen (Minn.)

Oct. 23, 2015

8 Amazing Things You Didn’t Know About Teeth

WEAR TV-3

Dr. Stu Bonnin (Fla.)

Oct. 23, 2015

Good and Bad Halloween Treats

Rutland Herald

Dr. Charles A. Bookwalter (Vt.)

Oct. 25, 2015

Fluoride Builds Strong Teeth

WDBO Radio

Dr. Carlos A. Bertot (Fla.)

Oct. 29, 2015

Halloween

ThisisReno.com

Dr. Whitney Garol (Nev.)

Oct. 29, 2015

Trick-Or-Treat: Reno Dentist Answers Questions About Halloween Candy

WTNH.com

Dr. Doug B. Keck (Conn.)

Oct. 30, 2015

How Much is Too Much When it Comes to Halloween Treats

St. George Daily Spectrum

Dr. Cody C. Hughes (Nev.)

Nov. 23, 2015

Brush up on Dental Hygiene

Web MD News

Dr. Paul V. Crespi (N.Y.)

Dec. 9, 2015

Dentistry Without the Drill? New Study Offers Hope

Thurston Talk

Drs. Gregory L. Psaltis & Scott Rowley (Wash.)

Dec. 10, 2015

Hard Work Becomes Heart Work

 

Ad Council Update

Ad Council’s National Brush Day Celebration

The Partnership for Healthy Mouths, Healthy Lives and the Ad Council created awareness by promoting healthy mouths and the importance of brushing your teeth. On National Brush Day, November 1 (and every day), parents and caregivers are encouraged to make sure their kids brush their teeth for two minutes, twice a day.  The holiday aims to reinforce the importance of children’s oral health and promote good tooth-brushing habits.

National Brush Day is part of the Kids’ Healthy Mouths campaign, a national initiative launched by The Partnership for Healthy Mouths, Healthy Lives and the Ad Council in 2012. It aims to help parents and caregivers understand why poor dental health can have serious consequences, and about simple ways in which they can help improve their children’s oral health and prevent dental disease.

AAPD national spokesperson Dr. Anupama Tate assisted in the outreach by participating in an English-language Bites and B-Roll package, which is a pre-recorded interview that is packaged as a news story and distributed to news outlets. 

AAPD Academic At-Large Trustee and national spokesperson Dr. Amr Moursi participated in a satellite media tour along with Dr. Jacobo with the HDA. They completed a total of 31 radio and television interviews across English and Spanish outlets. Most interviews started with covering best and worst types of candies and then went into National Brush Day, which allowed for some great messaging around the partnership and 2min2x.org.

There were a total of 48 airings/interviews, with over 2.9 million viewers.

 

Television Satellite Media Tour-Bits & B-Roll Package:

Airings: 24

Stations: 22

Markets: 20

Viewers: 378,000

 

Radio:

Interviews: 17

Affiliates: 54

Markets: 14

Audience: 1.55 million

 

Digital:

Postings: 7

Unique Site Visitors: 968,000

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