November 2021 Volume LVI Number 6

 
 
 
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Practice Management and Marketing News

November 2021 Volume LVI Number 6

Successful Hiring: How To Hire The Right Person and Train Effectively
 
Now, more than ever, building a great team is one of the most prominent challenges leaders face. Cultivating a cohesive team is critical to the success of a practice. Successful entrepreneurs find the right people by following an organized, systematic approach for hiring. If key steps are omitted, wrong candidates are hired just because they are breathing. We have heard that statement too many times. Statistics show that it costs a business a minimum of one and a half times an employee’s annual salary to replace hires that are not the right fit. Hire right the first time!
 
FIRST: Understand How People are Hard Wired
After extensive research, Professional DynaMetric Programs (PDP), www.pdpglobal.com, a worldwide leader in top-of- the-line behavioral assessment solutions for businesses, has defined the four essential behavior traits as Dominance (take charge), Extroversion (people), Pace (patience), and Conformity (systems). Each trait has high and low behavioral intensities. One of these four high traits will be a person’s strongest and dictate 50-70 percent of their natural be- havior and responses. It is almost like people come from four different "planets"; each "planet" has its own natural way of behaving and communicating, which will impact the success or failure of that person in a particular job.
 
Take Charge Trait
High Dominance
  • Can take charge, likes to accomplish goals, is comfortable with risks
  • Communication style is short and to the point, can often be interpreted as blunt
Low Dominance
  • Does not want to be in charge, looks for strong leadership
  • Agreeable
People Trait
High Extroversion
  • Outgoing, enthusiastic, motivating; prefers to interact with people and make others feel welcome and comfortable
  • Communication style is persuasive; they enjoy talking
Low Extroversion
  • Does not mind working alone
  • Quiet with people they do not know
Patience Trait
High Pace
  • Focuses on work output. Prefers routines and working on one thing at a time, does not like change
  • Communication style is warm, friendly, and careful to avoid confrontation
Low Pace
  • Likes change and fast pace
  • Can easily multi-task
Systems Trait
High Conformity
  • Prefers structured and standard operating procedures, concerned with accuracy
  • Communication style is guarded, cautious and exacting
Low Conformity
  • Can see the big picture and does not need a pre-set struc- ture to work in
  • Independent wants to live by their own rules
Work Style Approaches
Many times doctors do not understand why their employees wait to be told what to do. This can easily be explained by un- derstanding the three work style approaches. It is wise to hire a person with a Thrust or Ste-Nacity work style for any leadership position in the office.
 
Thrust
  • Initiates and completes a project or task with rocket launch energy and a persistent manner
Ste-Nacity
  • A coined word of PDP from steadfast and tenacious
  • Initiates and completes a project or task in a steady and persistent manner
Allegiance
  • Looks to an outer-directed source (supervisor) to be told what needs to be done
  • Supports completing a project, or task rarely initiates
SECOND: Follow a System
Have a written job description.
  • Identify specific job duties and traits/strengths needed to perform the job effectively. Behavioral assessment surveys help put the right person in the correct position by picking the candidate with the right strengths.
Write an effective ad.
  • The best workers are already working for someone else; however, they may not be satisfied and are looking for a change. Rather than placing a standard ad that is worded like everyone else’s, write an ad that includes motivators for the type of person you would like to hire.
Find applicants.
  • Word of mouth
  • Practice’s Facebook page
  • Indeed.com
  • DentalPost.net
  • ZipRecruiter.com
  • Millennials sometimes seek out employers. Large practices can have a section on their website, "Join our growing team," with information about applying for employment.
  • Post ad at the local college career center or dental assistant and hygiene schools.
Have applicants email resumes to the office.
  • This allows applicants to be prescreened and an indication of their ability to follow directions.
Narrow your list of applicants through a telephone or virtual interview. A good match can quickly be determined before spending time on an in-office interview.
  • The majority of a person’s communication is non-verbal; therefore, initial virtual interviews are recommended. Most candidates are familiar with virtual platforms such as Zoom.
  • Applicants can look good on paper, but they can have poor grammar, manners, interpersonal and verbal skills.
  • Review job requirements and the applicants’ skills and experiences.
  • Discuss salary range, benefit requirements, geographic location, and available work hours to see if they are com- patible.
  • Perform a social network scan online.
Initial In-Office Interview
To maximize efficiency, a well-trained team member, preferably the office manager, may conduct the initial interview with the Front Office or Clinical Coordinators, depending on which department is hiring.
  • Have the applicant complete the following forms:
    • Employment Application
    • Authorization for a criminal background check
    • Authorization to check references
  • Show the applicant a written job description and discuss the duties.
  • Prepare a list of interviewing questions that explore the following traits: initiative, organization, conscientiousness, communication, teamwork and experience.
  • Ask open-ended questions. Do not ask questions that can be answered with yes or no. If the interviewee begins answering with yes or no, ask them to explain.
  • The interviewer should talk less than 25 percent of the time. The purpose of the interview is to let the applicant share their abilities and experiences.
  • If the applicant is promising, have them take a tour of the office, meet team members and the doctor.
  • If the team feels the applicant is motivated and shows promise, continue with the next steps.
 
Hire based on behavioral strengths and traits, not only skills.
  • Have applicants take a behavioral assessment survey to determine if they have the strengths and traits needed to succeed in the position. This is one of the most important steps when hiring a new employee. An employee can be trained on specific job skills; however, it is difficult to change someone’s natural strengths or personality.
  • If the applicant’s trait survey shows, they have the right strengths for the job, proceed to the next steps.
 
Always check references.
  • This is essential! Many people know how to package themselves to cover up past problems. While employers might only be willing to confirm employment dates, try to determine their overall satisfaction with the employee by their tone of voice and other comments.
  • If the applicant has previously worked in a dental office, be sure you dial the office number and speak with the previ- ous employer. Applicants have been known to commit fraud by giving a friend’s cell phone number who is posing as the doctor for the reference check.
 
Describe your perceptions and observations of the applicant to determine if they are correct.
  • Ask the doctor if there is anything else they would like to share with you. One of the most crucial questions to ask is: "If you had a position open up in your office, would you rehire this person?"
  • Always have signed authorization to call references. Never contact an applicant’s current employer unless they have given permission. Not only could it cost an applicant their job, but it is also illegal.
Perform a criminal background check.
  • If the applicant’s references are positive, then complete a national criminal background check.
Conduct a skills assessment interview.
  • Ask the applicant to come in for a half-day skills assess- ment.
  • Observing the applicant in the office will indicate the applicant’s current skills, ability to work with others and follow directions, speed of work, and adaptability to your unique work environment.
  • Check your state laws for paying applicants for their time to ensure you are following required protocols.
Lunch out.
  • If the skills assessment goes well, suggest the applicant have lunch with team members they will most closely be working with. The doctor should pay for this lunch, but nei- ther the doctor nor the office manager should attend. Ask the team to observe and give feedback on the applicant’s politeness, manners, and personality outside the office. They should also assess the applicant’s interest in the job itself, not just the paycheck and benefits.
Ask the team’s opinion about hiring the applicant.
  • Is the team comfortable with this person and willing to let them into the dental family?
  • No matter how qualified the applicant is, if the team is unsupportive, there will be problems, and the new hire will eventually leave.
Proper Certification
  • Make certification verification a condition for employment. It is not uncommon to find dentists using assistants who had indicated they were licensed to take X-rays but who actually are not. Or, it has happened that a coronal polish- ing assistant presented themselves as a hygienist when they moved to a state that did not allow assistants to coro- nal polish. The unsuspecting dentist hired this person as a hygienist! They neglected to do a reference check.
Hiring
  • After the applicant accepts the position, have them com- plete all required personnel records. Employee files should be kept in a locked file.
Orientation for the New Employee
  • Introduce them to all team members.
  • They must be made to feel welcome and part of the team.
  • Have them read the Employee Manual and sign a state- ment that they have read and agree with the office poli- cies.
  • Review salary and benefits package.
  • Share and discuss the practice Patient and Team mission statements, what they mean and how to live it in the office.
  • Communicate the practice culture; who is in charge of what, who they report to, attitudes and communication expectations, along with your practice philosophy and beliefs.
  • Review the written job description.
Encourage team relationships.
  • Arrange to have different team members who will be working closely with the new employee go to lunch with them and have them check in regularly.
Training the new employee.
  • Create a list of duties for which they must be proficient. Mark the duties off as the employee demonstrates the ac- ceptable ability.
  • Assign a well-trained veteran staff member to instruct the new employee, answer questions, and check prog- ress.
  • Use the method; Tell, Show, Do
  • Ask:
    • What do you know about this?
    • What are your strengths, weaknesses?
    • How can I best teach you?
    • How do you like to learn something new?
  • Tell the new hire:
    • The importance of each function and how it fits into the big picture.
    • The benchmark of acceptable performance for each job duty they have.
  • Have the new hire role play as much as possible. They will not own the new behavior until they have done it them- selves many times.
Regularly coach the new employee.
  • Schedule a 5-10 minute debriefing with the new hire at the end of each day for the first two weeks and every other day for weeks three and four. The doctor and office manager should conduct a 30, 60, and 90-day review. Review daily with the new hire:
    • What they did well.
    • What and how do they need to do something differ- ently?
    • What do you want them to focus on the following day?
    • Ask what was their biggest struggle today?
    • Ask what they would like help with tomorrow?
    • Ask what they learned today that impacted them the most?
Hiring people is an art, not a science, and resumes can’t tell you whether someone will fit into a company’s culture."
~ Howard Schulz
 
LCP Dental Team Coaching is recognized as the premier consulting firm specializing in pediatric dentistry since 1996
 
 
 
 

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